How to Share an AdWords Account

by Alex Grechanowski on March 17, 2010

in PPC Asylum

I had another marketer set up something with my AdWords Account so that he could monitor the analytics and PPC. But I don’t want to give him control of my credit card. Do you know how to do this?

The good folks at Google wrote a detailed tutorial on inviting someone to access an AdWords account:

You can invite others to gain access to your account from the Account access page. These invited users sign in to your account with their own logins, so you can safeguard your own login information.” Step-by-step instructions >>>

But, due to numerous questions and delays over the nature of granting the access, for example, for our popular AdWords Audits, I need to add my 0.02 cents to the Guide.

One AdWords account per one email address.

First of all we need to understand that the procedure is different from sharing Google Analytics where you, the account owner, just add an email address of the person you want to share your GA account with – select an Access Type (View Reports or Administrator) – and we all set. And so with my Gmail I can access numerous Google Analytics accounts of folks who have shared it with me.

However, if you want to grant me access to your AdWords account, I need to have an email address NOT currently associated with any other AdWords account. So it makes perfect sense to ask me first about such an email address. Most likely I’ll need to create one.

Send an invite. But wait for one more link to click.

There are several steps for sharing an AdWords account.

1) From the main AdWords account, the account owner invites a PPC maven by entering his/her email address.

2) The PPC maven receives an email with a link to click. Then clicks it.

If the user accepts, you'll need to grant the user access to the account before he or she can sign in

But this is NOT the end.

3) The account owner receives an email from AdWords with a link to click and so finally grant the access.

So, as you see, there is a process that requires some time, attention and collaboration.